Books I Swear By

In my teens and early tweens, I could watch paint dry than read books! Yeah, that's how boring I thought reading was. How I wish I had started earlier! If you think reading is boring, this blog is for you.

Below are some of my most favorite books, I recommend them, these are the ones I swear by! (In no particular order) -

Man's Search for Meaning (by Viktor Frankl)

Man's Search for Meaning is a 1946 book by Viktor Frankl chronicling his experiences as an Auschwitz concentration camp inmate during World War II, and describing his psychotherapeutic method, which involved identifying a purpose in life to feel positively about, and then immersively imagining that outcome. According to Frankl, the way a prisoner imagined the future affected his longevity. The book intends to answer the question "How was everyday life in a concentration camp reflected in the mind of the average prisoner?"

 
     
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Genghis Khan and the Making of the Modern World (by Jack Weatherford)

Genghis Khan and the Making of the Modern World (2004) is a history book written by Jack Weatherford, Dewitt Wallace Professor of Anthropology at Macalester College. It is a narrative of the rise and influence of Genghis Khan and his successors, and their influence on European civilization. Weatherford provides a different slant on Genghis Khan than has been typical in most Western accounts, attributing positive cultural effects to his rule.

 
     
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Strengths Finder 2.0 (by Tom Rath)

In StrengthsFinder 2.0, Gallup unveils the new and improved version of its popular assessment, language of 34 themes, and much more. While you can read this book in one sitting, you'll use it as a reference for decades. Loaded with hundreds of strategies for applying your strengths, this new book and accompanying website will change the way you look at yourself -- and the world around you -- forever.

 
     
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The Greatest Salesman in the World (by Og Mandino)

The Greatest Salesman in the World is a book, written by Og Mandino, that serves as a guide to a philosophy of salesmanship, and success, telling the story of Hafid, a poor camel boy who achieves a life of abundance. The book was first published in 1968, and re-issued in 1983 by Bantam. A hardcover edition was published by Buccaneer Books in June, 1993. In 1970, Success Motivation Institute purchased the rights to produce the audio recording. If Mandino's suggested reading structure is followed, it would take about 10 months to read the book. The instructions are to read Scroll I (Chapter 8) three times a day for thirty days straight. Only after completing the thirty days of reading Scroll I, should you continue to Scroll II (Chapter 9) and so forth through Scroll X (Chapter 17).

 
     
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How to Lie with Statistics (by Darrell Huff)

How to Lie with Statistics is a book written by Darrell Huff in 1954 presenting an introduction to statistics for the general reader. Not a statistician, Huff was a journalist who wrote many "how to" articles as a freelancer. The book is a brief illustrated volume outlining errors when it comes to the interpretation of statistics, and how these errors may create incorrect conclusions. In the 1960s and 1970s, it became a standard textbook introduction to the subject of statistics for many college students. It has become one of the best-selling statistics books in history, with over one and a half million copies sold in the English-language edition. It has also been widely translated.

 
     
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The Richest Man in Babylon (by George S Clason)

The Richest Man in Babylon is a book by George Samuel Clason that dispenses financial advice through a collection of parables set in ancient Babylon. Through their experiences in business and managing household finance, the characters in the parables learn simple lessons in financial wisdom. Originally a series of separate informational pamphlets distributed by banks and insurance companies, the pamphlets were bound together and published in book form in 1926.

 
     
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48 Laws of Power (by Robert Greene)

The 48 Laws of Power (1998) is the first book by American author Robert Greene. The book is a bestseller, selling over 1.2 million copies in the United States, and is popular with prison inmates and celebrities. Greene initially formulated some of the ideas in The 48 Laws of Power while working as a writer in Hollywood and concluding that today's power elite shared similar traits with powerful figures throughout history. In 1995, Greene worked as a writer at Fabrica, an art and media school, and met a book packager named Joost Elffers. Greene pitched a book about power to Elffers and six months later, Elffers requested that Greene write a treatment.

 
     
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Rich Dad Poor Dad (by Robert T Kiyosaki)

Rich Dad Poor Dad is a 1997 book written by Robert Kiyosaki and Sharon Lechter. It advocates the importance of financial literacy (financial education), financial independence and building wealth through investing in assets, real estate investing, starting and owning businesses, as well as increasing one's financial intelligence (financial IQ) to improve one's business and financial aptitude. Rich Dad Poor Dad is written in the style of a set of parables, ostensibly based on Kiyosaki's life.

 
     
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Men are from Mars and Women are from Venus (by John Gray)

Men Are from Mars, Women Are from Venus (1992) is a book written by American author and relationship counselor John Gray, after he had earned degrees in meditation and taken a correspondence course in psychology. The book states that most common relationship problems between men and women are a result of fundamental psychological differences between the sexes, which the author exemplifies by means of its eponymous metaphor: that men and women are from distinct planets—men from Mars and women from Venus—and that each sex is acclimated to its own planet's society and customs, but not to those of the other. One example is men's complaint that if they offer solutions to problems that women bring up in conversation, the women are not necessarily interested in solving those problems, but mainly want to talk about them. The book asserts each sex can be understood in terms of distinct ways they respond to stress and stressful situations.

 
     
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The One Minute Manager (by Ken Blanchard and Spencer Johnson)

The book is written for managers who have to supervise and control their employees as well as complete certain essential office tasks. It covers certain techniques that could help its readers in improving their productivity, job satisfaction and personal prosperity. This is because individual satisfaction can gradually lead to the growth of any organisation. The authors of the book Kenneth Hartley Blanchard and Spencer Johnson have briefly explained few methods of management that are based on few studies in medicine and behavioural sciences. The book talks about three practical management techniques such as one minute goal setting, one minute praising and one minute reprimand. These three simple yet effective techniques could do wonders for both individual and organisational growth.

 
     
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Think and Grow Rich (by Napolean Hill)

Think and Grow Rich was written in 1937 by Napoleon Hill, promoted as a personal development and self-improvement book. Hill writes that he was inspired by a suggestion from business magnate and later-philanthropist Andrew Carnegie. While the book's title and much of the text concerns increased income, the author insists that the philosophy taught in the book can help people succeed in any line of work, to do and be anything they can imagine. First published during the Great Depression, at the time of Hill's death in 1970, Think and Grow Rich had sold more than 20 million copies, and by 2015 over 100 million copies had been sold worldwide. It remains the biggest seller of Napoleon Hill's books. BusinessWeek magazine's Best-Seller List ranked it the sixth best-selling paperback business book 70 years after it was published. Think and Grow Rich is listed in John C. Maxwell's A Lifetime "Must Read" Books List.

 
     
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Money Master the Game (by Tony Robbins)

Multimillion-copy bestselling author of Awaken the Giant Within and Unlimited Power has created a new 7-step blueprint for securing financial freedom. Based on extensive research and one-on-one interviews with more than 50 of the most legendary financial experts in the world - from Carl Icahn, to Warren Buffett, to Jack Bogle and Steve Forbes, Tony Robbins. Robbins has a brilliant way of using metaphor and story to illustrate even the most complex financial concepts - making them simple and actionable. With expert advice on our most important financial decisions, Robbins is an advocate for the reader, dispelling the myths that often rob people of their financial dreams. Tony Robbins walks readers of every income level, through the steps to become financially free by creating a lifetime income plan. This book delivers invaluable information and essential practices for getting your financial house in order. It's the book millions of people have been waiting for.

 
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